Imagine you are a soldier, returning home after a long and hard battle. As you near home, your heart swells with anticipation, your strides get longer and bells go off in your head. You instinctively touch the gifts you bear for your loved ones and your heart aches for the comforts of home. At this moment, your cup of fulfillment runneth over…

Now, put yourself in the garb of a lady, the returning soldier’s mother. You swoon with pride at the thought of your illustrious son’s bravery and look to make sure the grand welcome you have planned out for him befits a hero. The gods are in your good books today, they have safely returned your son from a treacherous war. You look around at his young wife and son – who is busy bursting crackers and enjoying the adulation of being a hero’s son. A miracle is about to ensue, and you are all for spreading sweet and light all over the world.

Your son appears on the horizon and the town erupts in joy – their hero has returned and the world seems more safer and meaningful. Gratitude is the chief emotion all around.

To me, this is what I love about Deepavali – arguably the most popular of festivals in India. It symbolizes the return of Rama, the prince of Ayodya from an unfair decade plus-long exile as a result of a devious maidservant’s advice to an emotionally charged stepmother. The festival has many more underpinning myths as well – but this is my favorite by far – a festival being celebrated to honor the long-awaited return of a son to his loving society and family.

An Indian festival cannot but not have a spiritual dimension, can it? Could this story also indicate the merging of the realized soul (the prince) with the ultimate (home) – of man becoming god as it were?

I’ll leave you with two wonderful links

1. Swami tejomayananda of the chinmayamission mission explains lucidly the genesis of the festival here

2. Jaggi vasudev brings in unique insight into why the festival is actually acelebration of clarity of enlightenment. We need no better endorsement now than this right?

One response »

  1. Dhivakar says:

    Great links…and good article…very creative and different connections

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